Business Showcase

The Chilean company Camanchaca was founded in 1965, taking its name from the distinctive cloud patterns that form over the coast where its fishing trawlers have operated until today. In the beginning, the company was focused on selling shrimp and langostinolobster but soon expanded into other areas including salmon aquaculture.

The Brazilian state of Minas Gerais is not as well known internationally as Rio de Janeiro or São Paulo, but the state may be the most important for Brazilians. Not only is it Brazil’s largest state by territory - covering more area than mainland France - it is also a powerhouse of agriculture and industry, and home to several of Brazil’s most important companies.

 

One such company is the energy firm, Cemig. With its headquarters in Belo Horizonte, the capital of Minas Gerais, it is responsible for around 12% of the electricity produced on the Brazilian national grid. As of 2018, it has over 50 power plants - most of them hydroelectric - and owns around 6,000 MW of generation capacity. 

The city of Panama may only have around 1.2 million inhabitants, but this doesn’t stop it from being one of the most lively cities in Latin America. The city expanded rapidly in the 20th century thanks to its prominent position on the Panama Canal, and is now home to over a third of its country’s population.

Last year Mota-Engil celebrated 70 years of existence as a recognised top 100 construction company worldwide. They have a presence in three continents spanning 22 countries with an employee headcount of over 25,000 employees. 

The volcanic island archipelago of Cape Verde is one of only five island nations on the continent of Africa, and the only one located off Africa’s Atlantic coast. This gives it a strategic location on air and sea routes, which primes it for growth in the coming years. All indications are that tourism will be central to this growth.

International sporting events can have highly positive long-term effects on the cities which host them. A prime example can be seen in Salvador, Bahia on the northeast coast of Brazil. The former colonial town was one of the host cities for the 2014 world cup when it visited Brazil. Thankfully, that tournament has had - and will continue to have - a positive long-term impact on the city’s infrastructure.

International sporting events can have highly positive long-term effects on the cities which host them. A prime example can be seen in Salvador, Bahia on the northeast coast of Brazil. The former colonial town was one of the host cities for the 2014 world cup when it visited Brazil. Thankfully, that tournament has had - and will continue to have - a positive long-term impact on the city’s infrastructure.

In the coming five years, it is believed that Riyadh, the ancient capital city of Saudi Arabia, will become the biggest city in the Middle East after Istanbul, reaching a population of 10 million. The arrival of its metro in 2018 is well timed then, promising to create a far more fluid transport system in this burgeoning city.

The wine industry can trace its roots back to at least 5,000 BC, where evidence exists that it was being consumed in various parts of Southern Europe and parts of Asia. Despite having a much more recent history in relative terms in Latin America, the wines of Chile and Argentina, (so-called ‘new world wines’) are already commonplace on the wine lists of the world’s most exclusive restaurants.